China and US battle for medal counts supremacy for London Olympics 2012 | The Summit Express

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China and US battle for medal counts supremacy for London Olympics 2012


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For the latest medal tally, China still leads London 2012 Olympics for achieving 12 medals  so far, 6 gold, 4 silver and 2 bronze. Meanwhile, United States overtake Italy with 11 medals in total ( 3/ 5/ 3).
China and US are two countries which are predicted to lead over-all medal supremacy.

Here's the Top 5 for July 30, 2012 update for medal Tally (gold/silver/bronze):

1. China- 12 (6/4/2)
2. United States- 11 (3/5/3)
3. Italy- 8 (2/4/2)
4. South Korea - 5 (2/1/2)
5. France- (2/1/1)

From the Wall Street Journal post, it said that  China became the first country since 1992 to win more Olympic gold medals than America.

The Wall Street Journal's medal projections for London suggest the Star-Spangled Banner will once again play more often than any other anthem.

China's victory in the gold-medal race in 2008 was supposed to herald the arrival of the newest Olympic superpower, a vast country with 1.3 billion people and a proven government-sponsored training program and even at the U.S. Olympic Committee headquarters in Colorado Springs, there was a growing sense that China would win the most gold and overall medals in 2012, Wall Street Journal said.

The Wall Street Journal's projections show Team U.S.A.'s 530 athletes should leave London with 40 gold medals and 108 overall, topping the Chinese, who are projected to collect 38 gold medals and 92 overall.

The Journal's forecasting system takes into account basic information such as interviews with experts and the performances of athletes in recent national and international competitions. But rather than simply anointing first-, second- and third-place finishers in each event and calling it a day, the model assigns probabilities to the top medal contenders, then uses those probabilities to project the most likely outcomes.


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