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    Annular solar eclipse on June 21 best viewed in Batanes, 68% in Metro Manila

    MANILA, Philippines – An annular solar eclipse occurs today, June 21, 2020, and will be visible as partial solar eclipse in the Philippines.
    Annular solar eclipse best viewed in Batanes

    The astronomical phenomenon coincides with the longest day of the year or June solstice and the celebration of the Father's Day.

    PAGASA Weather Specialist Ghela Lequiron said the annular eclipse happens when the Sun, Moon, and Earth align, and the Moon is at its “apogee,” or its furthest distance from the Earth.

    PAGASA Weather Specialist Ghela Lequiron explains annular solar eclipse.
    PAGASA Weather Specialist Ghela Lequiron explains annular solar eclipse.

    The annular phase of this solar eclipse will be visible from parts of Africa including the Central African Republic, Congo and Ethiopia; North of Yemen and Oman; South of Pakistan, northern India; China and Taiwan.

    The eclipse can be viewed in any part of the Philippines, but the "obscuration" or fraction of the Sun's surface area occulted by the moon will be bigger in northernmost parts of Luzon particularly in Itbayat, Batanes and Tuguegarao, Lequiron said.

    LOOK: Stunning photos of June 21 partial solar eclipse in the Philippines

    DOST will setup eclipse monitoring facilities at PAGASA Astronomical Observatory at UP Diliman campus. But due to COVID-19 pandemic, Lequiron said it is not open to the public.

    Itbayat will have the biggest obscuration at 91 percent while Tuguegarao will have 80 percent; Visayas, 52 to 66 percent; and Mindanao, 42 to 56 percent, she said.

    In Manila, partial eclipse will begin at 3:01 pm with maximum eclipse at 4:22 pm and obscuration of 68 percent.

    partial solar eclipse Philippines June 21
    Screengrab from PAGASA video report on Annular Solar Eclipse (Partial Solar Eclipse in the Philippines).

    The Philippines last witnessed an annular eclipse on December 26, 2019 in southernmost parts of the Philippines – particularly in Glan (Batulak), Balut and Sarangani Island.

    It is expected that the next annular solar eclipse visible in the Philippines will take place on February 28, 2063 which can be seen in most parts of Mindanao. Another annular solar eclipse will occur on July 24, 2074 passing through Southern Luzon.

    Annular solar eclipses:
    • Dec. 26, 2019 – Annual Solar Eclipse visible in the Philippines (Balut Island)
    • June 21, 2020 – Annular Solar Eclipse visible in the Philippines as Partial Solar Eclipse
    • June 10, 2021 – Annual Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines
    • Oct. 14, 2023 – Annual Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines
    • Oct. 02, 2024 – Annual Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines
    • Feb. 17, 2026 – Annual Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines
    • Feb. 06, 2027 – Annual Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines
    • Jan. 26, 2028 – Annular Solar Eclipse not visible in the Philippines

    How to view the solar eclipse?

    PAGASA advised the public not to stare directly at the eclipse to avoid blindness and harmful radiation coming form the sun. Enthusiasts may use solar eclipse glasses, binoculars or telespecope with solar filter.

    Some of the alternatives to observe the eclipse are through use of welder's glass but not for long time, water reflection or pinholes on a cardboard sheet or paper.

    Partial solar eclipse
    PAGASA gives alternative ways to observe solar eclipse.

    Annular Solar Eclipse (Partial Solar Eclipse in the Philippines)
    Annular Solar Eclipse (Partial Solar Eclipse in the Philippines)

    An Annular Solar Eclipse will occur on June 21, 2020. It will be visible from a track that goes across Most of Africa, S.E. Europe, Asia and Micronesia.
    Posted by Dost_pagasa on Thursday, June 18, 2020

    Summer solstice

    Philippine nights are at their shortest and daytimes are at their longest during the Summer Solstice, which falls on June 21 at 5:44 A.M. (Philippine Standard Time).

    This is the time when the Sun attains its greatest declination of +23.5 degrees and passes directly overhead at noon for all observers at latitude 23.5 degrees North, which is known as the Tropic of Cancer.

    This event marks the start of the apparent southward movement of the Sun in the ecliptic.

    — The Summit Express

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