How drones at Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl 2017 performance worked


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Pop superstar Lady Gaga definitely shoot for the stars when she delivered an epic performance at the Super Bowl Ll halftime show on Sunday, February 5. While Gaga earned praises for her electrifying production number, hundreds of light-emitting drones flying to form the pattern of the American flag as well as the Pepsi logo certainly stole the show.

Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl 2017 performance
PHOTO CREDIT: Elle.com
Apparently, the LED lights that appeared to be magically flying were actually carried by drones called Shooting Star. Intel programmers were the creative genius behind the technology which was also recently used at a 3-week show in Disney World in the US.

Each drone weighs over 8 ounces, measures about a foot long square and has a plastic and foam body to soften accidental impacts. Each of this device communicates wirelessly with a central computer to execute the routine.

Before the show, the computer checks the battery level as well as the GPS signal strength of each drone and eventually assigns roles. Should a drone malfunction during the show, there’s a reserve unit ready to take over the spot of its fallen comrade.

The pretty impressive lights display was a result of the 4 billion color combinations that the multicolor onboard LED is capable of producing.

Interestingly, the current version of software is capable of controlling 10,000 drones at a time. However, this claim is yet to be demonstrated.

Intel has been working with the technology for 2 years now and has partnered with technology researchers and artists. Hoping to use the drone fleet technology beyond entertainment purposes, the tech giant is developing technology so that drones will be capable of accomplishing bigger tasks such as search and rescue as well as inspecting areas dangerous to humans.

Watch the stellar performance of Lady Gaga and the Shooting Star here.


--Mini, The Summit Express

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