LOOK: Alleged child beggar’s photos puzzle netizens | The Summit Express

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LOOK: Alleged child beggar’s photos puzzle netizens



MANILA, Philippines - Photos of a good-looking child beggar are making rounds online after these were shared on the Facebook page ‘Tag Mo Na Yan’ on Sunday, July 3. With over 1,000 shares and 8,000 likes, the photos have gone viral as netizens dubbed the child beggar as “poging manlilimos.”

Photos of an alleged child beggar go viral.
'POGING MANLILIMOS'? Photos of an alleged child beggar go viral.
Several netizens question the authenticity of the post since they think that the young boy seems too neat and tidy to be a beggar. Some speculated that the photos were released so the young boy can get a shot in fame just like the viral Carrot Man and Badjao Girl, ordinary people who became an overnight sensation with the help of social media.

Others believe that the photos were posted as part of a social experiment similar to that of UNICEF’s. The recent social experiment by the UNICEF showed how strangers reacted differently towards a clean-looking girl and an unkempt one.

On the other hand, some netizens said that they are willing to adopt the good-looking beggar.

What do you think is the real score behind these viral photos of an alleged child beggar?

How to help child beggars in the Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) is discouraging the public from giving money to child beggars based on the Anti-Mendicancy Law of the Philippines. Under this 35-year law, those who engage in begging and giving alms will be imposed a fine of P500.

Instead of giving alms, people are encouraged to make donations to organizations for street children. You may also buy them something to eat and spend time to get to know them.

“If we want to help the mendicants and streetchidren, we must channel this through the proper government agencies, such as the DSWD and several non-governmental organizations,” said former DSWD Secretary Corazon “Dinky” Soliman.

--Mini, The Summit Express